Ayer Rotary Club

 
 
Club Executives & Directors
President
President 2017-2018 (PE)
President 2018-2019 (VP)
Immediate Past President
Secretary
Treasurer
Sgt at Arms
Foundation Chair
Polio Challenge Chair
Membership Chair
PR Chair
Speaker Chair
Newsletter Chair
Website Chair
Social Media
Photographer
RYLA Chair
Youth Exchange
Projects Chair
Scholarship Chair
International Chair
Club Advisor
 

Club Information

Service Above Self

Ayer

Service Above Self

We meet Thursdays at 6:00 PM
Bull Run Restaurant
215 Great Rd (Route 2A)
Shirley, MA  01464
United States
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Home Page Stories
 
With proceeds from last year's Ducky Wucky River Race, the Ayer Rotary Club recently gave dictionaries as a personal gift to every third-grade student at the Page Hilltop School in Ayer.
 
 
Third-grade students at the Page Hilltop Elementary School received personalized dictionaries from the Ayer Rotary Club during a recent class assembly, just one example of public service funded by the club's annual Ducky Wucky River Race.  Inscribed with each child’s name, the dictionaries are a gift meant to help students improve their communications skills and encourage them to excel in school.
 
“We are excited to provide a gift to each third grader to show them the Ayer Rotary Club and the entire community support their education and want them to succeed in school.  We hope this will be the first year of a new annual tradition, and we thank the many individuals and sponsors who donate generously to support the community service work of the Ayer Rotary Club,” said Michael Phelan, the club’s president for 2015-16.
 
 
 
The date for the famous Ducky Wucky River Race is set for May 7 and one lucky duck will win the grand prize of dinner for two anywhere in the world.  Tickets are now available from Ayer Rotary Club members and participating ticket sellers.
 
 
Rotarians pick up the rubber duckies after the race is finished.  
 
The race will kick off at 4:30 p.m. - rain or shine - with up to 5,000 rubber ducks racing down the Nashua River in Harvard.  The bib number on the winning duck will determine which ticket holder wins the grand prize.  Past prize winners have traveled to Venice, Paris, Tokyo, Cape Town, Sydney, and Jakarta.
 
Tickets will also be available on race day at the annual Apple Blossom Festival on Harvard Common.  The festival is a popular family attraction featuring live music, shopping, food,children’s games and fire truck rides.  The festival is held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mark your calendars!!  A day of family fun and festivities. The Apple Blossom Festival features crafts, food & music, and it's your last chance to buy your ticket to the world famous Ducky Wucky River Race.  More information at www.DuckyWucky.org 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This is the time of year when most families plan holiday gatherings. But for some area residents, attending a holiday dinner with family simply isn’t possible because they physically can’t leave their homes.  On November 14 and 15, the Ayer, Harvard, Shirley, Devens Rotary Club changed that situation for one Shirley couple. The Club built a wheelchair ramp for two elderly residents who had been virtually housebound for several years.
 
“This is wonderful,” the ramp recipient, a 92 year old man, said, “I can’t thank you people enough. Now we can go to our daughter’s for Thanksgiving. It will be the first time in years that we’re able to go.” The man’s wife has severe rheumatoid arthritis and was not able to go up and down the three stairs to her front door. In order to leave her home, she had to be physically carried out by two people.
 
 
 
 
 
 
On Saturday, October 24th, Ayer Rotarians gathered at the Devens Community Center to host the Annual Senior Citizen BBQ.  Special thanks to our friends from the Nashoba Valley Concert Band for providing great entertainment!
 
 
 

 
 

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 Ayer Rotary Club President Melissa Fetterhoff, Dr. Steve Beckman of the Harvard Ambulance Service, and Ayer Rotarian Bill Spacciapoli
The Ayer Rotary Club presented a $1,300 check to the Harvard Ambulance Service for the purchase of four two-way radios for use by EMTs responding to emergencies.  President Melissa presented the donation to Dr. Steve Beckman, director of the Ambulance Service at last week's meeting.

Dr. Beckman was the evening's speaker and told about the efforts of the ambulance service to have round-the-clock staffing and to reduce response times to emergencies.  He particularly stressed the uniqueness of having Bromfield High School students as trained EMTS who are able to leave school and respond to daytime calls.  The busiest period of the day is between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., when they have 43 percent of their calls.

Beckman said they are using a strategy of sending a responding EMT directly to the scene of the call, while another retrieves the ambulance.  This allows the on-scene EMT to assess the situation and begin treatment.  However, he said a lack of two-way radios was impeding the service's efforts to effectively communicate.  

The Harvard Ambulance Service is funded entirely from insurance billing and donations, and it receives no taxpayer support from the town.  However, Beckman said the service's revenues just keep up with expenses, leaving little extra for equipment purchases.

 
 

 
 
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